Is Pro-Life Club Cause for Concern?

The newly formed Branford High Right to Life Club has stirred a little controversy. The newly formed Knitting Club has not.

By Marisa Kaplita

Editor-In-Chief

Two different clubs have emerged at BHS in the past month; one I have heard almost nothing about and one that I can’t stop hearing about.

The knitting club has already had several meetings and they have plans to knit things to sell to raise money for students who can’t afford to take SATs.  Personally I think that these are a great group of kids trying their best to be model citizens.

However, by this school’s standards that isn’t even worth talking about.  Especially now, with a group of “religious, rock-throwing, terrorist pro-life” activists banding together to defragment the entire fabric lines of the school’s reform system, how would we even get a chance to talk about the knitting club?

Recently, a Pro-Life Club – Branford Students For Life – was organized at BHS, prompting a parent to complain to the Board of Education.

For video of the meeting, click here.

Furthermore, our own school’s obsession on the negative drama is overwhelmingly upsetting.  It is amazing how creative people can be when they don’t have actual facts to work off of.

So I have investigated the matter, and guess what? The mystery is solved!  But unfortunately for all you thrill seekers there are no rocks involved and no one is going to throw a religious pamphlet down your throat.

Sam Bailey-Loomis, founder of the Pro-Life Club, spoke with The Buzz her plans for the club.  At meetings she is planning to coordinate fundraisers, show different films, have open debates between club members, and have informed speakers come and talk to the students.

Her interest in starting this group stems back to her first year of high school and she brought her message public this  fall when she wrote several anti-abortion messages on the school sidewalk as part of National Pro-Life Chalk Day.

For those students who believe this is a religious group, according to Bailey-Loomis, she says “the group is completely secluded from any religious perspective.” She stated that she would be fine talking with any student separately if they wanted to discuss something on a religious basis, however, “my group is backed by science and morals and we will only discuss the facts and the truth.”

“There’s time for a change in this school.”  Bailey-Loomis concluded. “If the school is so diverse they should be encompassing of everything.”

According the club’s mission statement, members of the club “work to protect life from conception to natural death, particularly those lives threatened by abortion, infanticide, embryonic stem cell research and euthanasia.  In furtherance of these goals, members seek to promote respect from life at Branford High School and on a local, state and national level, to educate on life issues, to help those in need so that life is a promising choice and to work with others who share common goals.”

Ten students attended the first meeting on Friday, February 22nd, and three become committed members of the club.  “Students from all different views were at the meeting – some were even pro-choice… I was glad to see that although we had differing perspectives, these students kept an open mind!”

When asked if anyone came to “check-up” on their meeting, Bailey Loomis said, “No. No one from administration, no one from Board of Ed, and no parents.  Just curious open minded students.”

She has plans to have future meetings for any student with any viewpoint to come and learn.  She also says she is open to anyone who wants to talk to her about the club; just go up to her, and start asking questions.

In the meantime maybe our town needs to stop being so quick to make decisions based on stereotypes and start asking around for the facts.   We can’t all be reporters, but we all know how to ask questions, and don’t be afraid to question everything, because that’s when you start to get to the facts.

What do you think about the club? Leave your comments below or on Facebook.

(editor’s note: Bailey-Loomis  is also a reporter for The Buzz .)